Descents From Edward III For Thomas Adams (1655-1722), Recorder of York



The Adamses were a West Riding squirearchy family seated at the manor
of Owston, 6 miles north of Doncaster, since at least the late 16th
century. Philip Adams of Owston (d. c.1622) married in 1600, Gertrude
Bosville, and their son and heir William Adams of Owston (d. 1638)
married in 1624, a Lincolnshire lady, Margaret Ellis (d. 1659). It
was their eldest son and heir, Sir William Adams of Owston (bapt. at
Owston 25 February 1627; died 12 February 1667) who was the first
member of the family to receive any local administrative office, and
appropriately enough, the first (and only) one to marry into the
bloodline of Edward III. Sir William inherited the family lands when
he was age 11, and no marriage had been arranged before his father's
death. He came of age in 1648, and that year made a very good match -
to Mary Dawnay (born by 1630; died 16 May, buried at Owston 20 May
1698), youngest sibling of Sir Christopher Dawnay, 1st Baronet.
Cowick, the chief seat of the Dawnays, was in the same wapentake as
Owston, but William's marriage into such a prominent and well-
connected Yorkshire family is unusual: Mary Dawnay's four (possibly
six) descents from Joan Beaufort alone are given below, while
William's ancestry was purely minor gentry. The status of the
Dawnays, active supporters of Charles I in the civil wars, was none
too certain in 1648 - the king was captured, Parliament firmly in
control, the 1st Baronet killed four years previous, and his younger
brother John Dawnay and widowed mother Elizabeth Hutton Dawnay
quarreling with his own widow over his estate. A match for her
youngest child with a promising squire from a nearby manor could at
least reassure the widow Elizabeth that Mary would be provided for and
very nearby.

The influence and standing of the Dawnays was greatly improved by the
Restoration in 1660, and William Adams benefited, too. He was made a
justice of the peace for the West Riding, was knighted in late 1664 or
early 1665, and at some point acquired Scawsby Hall, just a few miles
from Owston. The Adamses had 4 sons and 4 daughters by 1668, but only
two sons and two daughters appear to have survived to adulthood, or at
least have recorded death dates. Margaret Adams (1658-15 July 1730)
and Jane Adams (1664-29 January 1684) do not seem to have married, but
as their death dates were taken from IGI, firm details are wanting for
them, as well as for the other two daughters living at the 1665
Visitation pedigree of the family, Elizabeth Adams (probably baptized
at Howden 21 September 1651) and Mary Adams (born 1660). The fate of
their two youngest brother, Philip Adams (born 1662), is also
unknown. Eldest son William Adams died young by 1665, so in 1667 it
was second son John Adams (1653-1701) who succeeded to Owston and
Scawsby at age 14. John lived an over-extravagant lifestyle and
accumulated large debts, which required him to sell off most of the
family property. He waited until the death of his mother Dame Mary
(who lived to see her brother become a Viscount in 1681) in 1698 to
sell the manor of Owston to Henry Cooke. Though married twice, first
to Vere (living 1688), daughter of Sir John Jackson, 1st Baronet, of
Hickleton, and second to Elizabeth (d. 1718), daughter of Anthony
Elcock, he is said to have died without issue (in a 1942 pedigree of
Adams of Owston by John William Walker, printed in H.S.P. 94). His
younger brother Thomas Adams (1655-7 April 1722) seems to have been
far more responsible, becoming a barrister-at-law (he was admitted to
Gray's Inn in 1672), and holding the office of Recorder of York.
Walker states Thomas died unmarried, and if so, then the issue of Sir
William Adams and Mary Dawnay would appear to be extinct.

Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland (c.1379-1440), had two sons (A1
& B1) and two daughters (C1 & F1). [Note: lines E & F below are
included just in case E5 was legitimate. Betham's 'Baronetage' did
not cover the Musgraves of Hayton.]

A1) George Nevill, 1st Lord Latimer (c.1411-1469), who had
A2) Sir Henry Nevill (d. 1469) m. Joan Bourchier (d. 1470, descended
from Edward III but not thru Joan Beaufort), and had
A3) Richard Nevill, 2nd Lord Latimer (1468-1530) m. 1)1483 Anne
Stafford, and had
A4) Dorothy Nevill (1496-1532) m. 1514 Sir John Dawnay of Sessay (d.
1553), and had
A5) Sir Thomas Dawnay of Sessay (d. 1566) m. Edith Darcy (see below),
and had
A6) Sir John Dawnay of Sessay m. c.1560 Elizabeth Tunstall (see B6
below)
A7) Sir Thomas Dawnay of Sessay (1563-1642) m. Faith Legard, and had
A8) John Dawnay of Cowick (d. 1630) m. Elizabeth Hutton (see E8
below), and had
A9) Mary Dawnay (by 1630-1698) m. 1648 Sir William Adams of Owston,
Yorks. (1627-1667), and had
A10) Thomas Adams, 3rd son (1655-1722), Recorder of York

B1) Richard Nevill, Earl of Salisbury (c.1400-1460), who had
B2) George Nevill, Archbishop of York (1432-1476), who had
B3) Alice Nevill, illeg., m. c.1475, Thomas Tunstall (d. 1494/99), and
had
B4) Sir Brian Tunstall of Thurland, Lancs. (c.1480/85-1513) m. Isabel
Boynton (d. aft. 1539), and had
B5) Sir Marmaduke Tunstall of Thurland (1507-1557) m. c.1525 Mary
Scargill (see D6 below), and had
B6) Elizabeth Tunstall (c.1531/40-bef. 1578) m. c.1560 Sir John
Dawnay of Sessay (see A6 above)

C1) Elizabeth Ferrers, Lady Greystoke (1393-1434), who had (with D2 &
E2 below),
C2) Joan Greystoke (c.1410-aft. 1472) m. Sir John Darcy of Temple
Hurst, Yorks. (1404-1458), and had
C3) Richard Darcy (c.1424-c.1450) m. Eleanor Scrope, and had
C4) Sir William Darcy of Temple Hurst (1443-1488) m. 1461 Euphemia
Langton, and had
C5) Thomas Darcy, 1st Lord Darcy (c.1467-1537), m. 1)Dowsabel Tempest,
and had
C6) George Darcy, 1st Lord Darcy of Aston (d. 1558) m. 1511 Dorothy
Melton (c.1505-1557), and had
C7) Edith Darcy m. Sir Thomas Dawnay of Sessay (see A5 above)

D2) Anne Greystoke (d. 1477) m. 1433 Sir Ralph Bigod of Settrington
(1410-1461), and had
D3) Anne Bigod (d. 1531) m. Sir William Conyers of Sockburn (d. 1490),
and had
D4) Christopher Conyers of Sockburn m. Anne Markenfield, and had
D5) Jane Conyers m. Sir Robert Scargill of Scargill, and had
D6) Mary Scargill (d. 1578) m. c.1525 Sir Marmaduke Tunstall
(see B5 above)

E2) Ralph, 5th Lord Greystoke (c.1414-1487), who had
E3) Sir Robert Greystoke (d. 1483) m. 1) Elizabeth Grey (see F3
below), and had
E4) Elizabeth Greystoke (1471-1516) m. Thomas, 3rd Lord Dacre
(1467-1525), and had
E5) Elizabeth Dacre m. Thomas Musgrave of Hayton Castle (d. 1532), and
had
E6) Eleanor Musgrave m. Anthony Hutton of Penrith, Cmbrlnd (d. 1589),
and had
E7) Sir Richard Hutton of Goldsborough, Yorks., 2nd son (1561-1639) m.
Agnes Briggs (d. 1648), and had
E8) Elizabeth Hutton (liv. 1650) m. John Dawnay of Cowick (see A8
above)

F1) Eleanor Nevill, Countess of Northumberland (d. 1473), who had
F2) Katherine Percy , Countess of Kent (1423-1504), who had
F3) Elizabeth Grey (d. 1472) m. Sir Robert Greystoke (see E3 above)

Cheers, ------Brad

.



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