Re: Catholic births in Glasgow



Hugh Watkins <hugh.watkins@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:

Charles Ellson wrote:
On Thu, 20 Apr 2006 18:00:22 +0100, " Jill"
<news@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:


Am I right in thinking that the only place I am going to find details of a
catholic birth between 1834 - 1845 in Glasgow will be at the National
Archives in Edinburgh?


If the records survived and copies (IIRC not originals for RC records)
have been deposited with the NAS then yes, otherwise any surviving RC
records might still be held somewhere in the organisation of the
Scottish RC church.

there are no catholic biths

there are baptisms recorded after the birth

sometimes years after the birth
or as a family group in case of a conversion

remember to distinguish between medical and civil records
and records of religious rituals

new advent glasgow

St Kentigern Bishop, founder of the See of Glasgow, b. about 518; d. at
Glasgow, 13 January, 603.
About 553 a strong anti-Christian movement in Strathclyde compelled
Kentigern to leave the district, and he retired to Wales,


http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06577b.htm
ARCHDIOCESE OF GLASGOW (GLASGUENSIS)
. . . twenty-three successors in actual possession till 1560, when the
Catholic Faith was abolished by act of the Scottish Parliament.

William Turnbull (consecr. 1447, d. 1454) obtained in 1450 from Pope
Nicholas V the charter of foundation for the University of Glasgow

James Beaton, nephew of the celebrated cardinal of the same surname, was
the fourth and last archbishop of the old hierarchy. In 1560, eight
years after his nomination, he was forced to retire to France, where he
acted as confidential agent of Queen Mary, and later openly as
ambassador for James VI, till his death in Paris, 25 April, 1603. He
carried away with him the diocesan records, two of which deserve special
mention: (1) "Registrumn Vetus Ecclesiae Cathedralis Glasguensis", in
handwriting of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, and (2) "Liber
Ruber Ecclesiae Glasguensis", with entries from about 1400 to 1476.
These, along with other records, were in 1843 printed in a handsome
volume for the Maitland Club under the title: "Registrum Episcopatus
Glasguensis: Munimenta Ecclesiae Metropolitanae Glasguensis a sede
restauratâ saeculo ineunte XII ad reformatam religionem".

Glasgow did not again become a centre of Catholic life till about the
beginning of the nineteenth century. The great industrial development
which then began drew to the city and its neighbourhood Catholics from
the Scottish Highlands and later, in far greater numbers, from Ireland.
In 1828 the Holy See erected the Western District or Vicariate of
Scotland, and the first vicar Apostolic to reside in Glasgow was Andrew
Scott, Bishop of Eretria (b. 1772, d, 1846). He was succeeded by John
Murdoch, Bishop of Castabala (b. 1796, d. 1865) and John Gray, Bishop of
Hypsopolis (b. 1817, d. 1872). On the resignation of Bishop Gray in 1869
Charles Eyre (b. 1817, d. 1902) was consecrated Archbishop of Anazarba
and appointed administrator Apostolic. On the restoration of the
Scottish hierarchy by Leo XIII, 4 March, 1878, the Archbishopric of
Glasgow was re-established, and Archbishop Eyre was transferred to the
restored see. He bad consolidated the work of his predecessors in the
former vicariate, and had laid the foundations for a complete diocesan
organization. In 1884 he obtained from the Holy See the erection of a
cathedral chapter with a provost and eleven canons. He introduced a
thorough system of inspection in religious knowledge for the schools of
the archdiocese. He was also the founder in 1874 of the diocesan college
for higher studies, to house which he erected in 1892 at his own cost a
building worthy of the purpose. He was succeeded in 1902 by John
Aloysius Maguire (b. 1851), who had been consecrated as auxiliary bishop
in 1894. The Catholics of the Glasgow district are computed at 380,000
out of a general population within the same bounds of 1,180,000. The
number of Catholic baptisms in 1906 was 14,785. Taking the statistics
available for 1908, there are 91 quasi-parishes, with 271 priests on
active service distributed over 21 deaneries. There are 7 religious
communities of men, and 16 of women. There are Catholic elementary
schools in all the quasi-parishes, besides 14 upper-schools and a
training college for female teachers. The teaching staff of the
archdiocese numbers 1230. The number of children presented in 1907 for
religious examination in the elementary schools was 55,350. There are 15
charitable institutions of various kinds, and there is a conference of
the St. Vincent de Paul Society in nearly every quasi-parish.

so these records if not in the parish will be in the archives

http://www.rcag.org.uk/Archives/A1.htm

The archdiocesan archive, based in the Curial Offices at 196 Clyde
Street, Glasgow, G1 4JY, is primarily the archive of the Bishop's
Chancery and Office.

The correspondence and Minute Books within the archive date principally
from the arrival in the west of Scotland, in January 1869, of Archbishop
Charles Eyre. Information on records available for consultation can be
obtained from the archivist.

It is possible, by prior appointment, for researchers to visit the
archive. Appointments should be made by contacting the archivist either
by letter, or by 'phone on 0141-226-5898 x154. When arranging your first
visit new readers will be asked to provide a letter of introduction, for
example from their supervisor.

http://www.rcag.org.uk/Archives/A2.htm




The archdiocesan archive holds, in the Curial Offices at 196 Clyde
Street, Glasgow, G1 4JY, original registers with a starting-date prior
to the introduction of civil registration in Scotland in 1855.
Photocopies of these registers are also normally held in the parish to
which they relate, and in the Scottish Record Office in Edinburgh
(reference: RH21).

It is possible, by prior appointment, for enquirers to visit the archive
and search the registers. Appointments should be made by contacting the
archivist either by letter, or by telephone on 0141-226-5898 x154.

It is not possible for the archive staff to undertake open-ended
searches of the registers, and it may be necessary to advise that you
must either make an appointment to conduct the search yourself and/or
seek the services of a professional genealogical researcher

read on on the web site

snipped


>>
BAPTISMAL REGISTERS
will normally provide the child's name, names of parents and
sponsors(godparents), date of birth, date of baptism, and the name of
the priest administering the Sacrament. They do not provide the address
of the family at the time of baptism. Nor do they provide information on
place of origin.
[MAKE CERTAIN THE CHURCH AS BUILT *before* the event you are researching]

MARRIAGE REGISTERS
will normally provide the names of the bride and groom, the names
of the witness(es), and the name of the officiating priest. They will
not provide the address at the time of marriage, nor do they normally
provide information on place of birth. However, from 1808 till the
mid-1830s the marriage registers for St.Andrew's, Glasgow, do provide
information regarding the place of origin of the bride and groom.

CONFIRMATION REGISTERS
The survival of these registers is inconsistent. Confirmation Registers
usually comprise a list of names of those confirmed, and the names of
the sponsors. No personal and/or family information is given concerning
those being confirmed. The practice of having individual sponsors is
relatively modern. Previous practice had one female sponsor for all the
girls, and one male sponsor for all the boys.

DEATHS REGISTERS
It was, and is, not common practice for parishes to keep registers of
deaths.

POST-1855 PARISH REGISTERS
Registers with a starting-date later than 1855 are normally kept in the
individual parishes. Please note that for enquiries after 1855 the exact
date of birth and/or marriage should be provided.

Access to presbytery and parish records is at the discretion of the
parish priest. <<<

a useful web page
http://home.att.net/~Local_Catholic/


In England I saw in Liverpool Archives a baptismal record kept in a 3d
notebook by a missionary priest baptising people in the front room of
his lodgings

The records are kept in latin (including names - search www for a list
of latin forms of names before your visit) but in Birmingham the part
time archivist was a working priest and naturally fluent in latin and
very helpful.

pre reformation records in the Vatican library include copies of court
decisions about annulment of marriages for example
http://www.vatican.va/library_archives/vat_library/

http://bav.vatican.va/en/v_home_bav/home_bav.shtml
catalogue seems to be off line


Hugh W
.



Relevant Pages

  • Re: Catholic births in Glasgow
    ... catholic birth between 1834 - 1845 in Glasgow will be at the National Archives in Edinburgh? ... The great industrial development which then began drew to the city and its neighbourhood Catholics from the Scottish Highlands and later, in far greater numbers, from Ireland. ... The archdiocesan archive holds, in the Curial Offices at 196 Clyde Street, Glasgow, G1 4JY, original registers with a starting-date prior to the introduction of civil registration in Scotland in 1855. ...
    (soc.genealogy.britain)
  • Re: Catholic births in Glasgow
    ... catholic birth between 1834 - 1845 in Glasgow will be at the National ... Archives in Edinburgh? ... The archdiocesan archive holds, in the Curial Offices at 196 Clyde Street, Glasgow, G1 4JY, original registers with a starting-date prior ... Photocopies of these registers are also normally held in the parish to ...
    (soc.genealogy.britain)
  • Re: Old Electoral Registers
    ... These are a very valuable resource for tracking family movements. ... registers - and FreeReg - we are all at the mercy of local decision makers ... BT Archives ...
    (soc.genealogy.britain)
  • Re: Catholic births in Glasgow
    ... catholic birth between 1834 - 1845 in Glasgow will be at the National ... Lanarkshire registers (IIRC usually copies) in class RH21:- ... "The dates of foundation of these churches are given but the baptismal ...
    (soc.genealogy.britain)
  • Re: Singing legend on school register
    ... I came across a punishment book whilst looking through some registers. ... formation loose. ... first to 75, and now, in some archives, to 100 years. ...
    (soc.genealogy.britain)