Re: Interview of Daugavpils mayor




"vello" <vellokala@xxxxxx> wrote in message
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On Sep 12, 11:16 am, "J. Anderson" <anderso...@xxxxxxxx> wrote:
"Dmitry" <dmitrijsfedot...@xxxxxxxx> wrote in message

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On 11 Sep, 22:22, lorad...@xxxxxx wrote:

It's the same in a lot of other eu countries;
party decides who gets what district.
In UK, voters decide who represents their
constituency in parliament.

In principle, yes, but before that somebody, somewhere, decides who is
the
party's candidate in the constituency.

In Britain, the cradle of parliamentary rule, a situation would be
possible
where Party B gets 49.9% of the votes in the country but does not get a
single seat in Parliament -- because Party A won in all constituencies
with
the smallest possible margin. I wouldn't call that representational
democracy.

Why not? It seems their political wiews (or better marketing) give
them support of maiority in any part of UK , despite small one:-). In
US GWB is full president, not a 50,0000000000001% of a president as
woulld be by results of elections. Estonia got a good (hm?) lesson
after ww1 - our constitution creates parliament what reflects
political preferences of people perfectly - but was unable to work,
coz almost any MP was from different party one. If a bus with tourists
will reach crossroad, they may vote how they want, there is just two
options - to left or to right (OK, turning back is also an option).

In this country politics is about working out compromises that can be
accepted by a bigger share of the electorate than the supporters of one
single party. It seems to be functioning quite well, just look at the
cabinet combinations we've had during the last 20 years: right-left,
centre-right, left-right, centre-left and now centre-right!

I don't believe in one-party rule, which in Scandinavia invariably would
mean a social democratic government, because no other party comes even near
a majority position. Like the recent changes in Sweden and Finland show,
people are presently fed up with rigid, frigid and ideologically barren
social democracy.


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