Re: OT: BP - The tip of the iceberg



On 6/16/2010 5:31 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
Larry Blanchard<lblanch@xxxxxxxxxxx> writes:
On Wed, 16 Jun 2010 13:03:26 -0400, Keith Nuttle wrote:

Solar energy is will never be available more than have of the time. Suns
only shines for about 12 hours per day unless you are in Alaska. No
energy when it gets dark.

As any sailor known the wind is fluky, and cannot be depended on for a
constant source of energy. Most of the time it will be blowing too hard
for the system to use, or not hard enough. If it was dependable, all of
our ocean travel would still be done under sail, and the Dutch windmill
would not have disappeared.

Agreed on the above. But a few options you didn't mention are
hydropower, tides and geothermal. They are pretty reliable :-).

Were you aware that all the Hydro in California are peakers,
not baseload? There are two reasons for that:

1) Hydro can crank up and shut down quickly. That's not the
case for thermal plants (gas, coal, nuclear).

2) Due to seasonal fluctuations and limited storage capacity
(Shasta's 4.5m acre-feet wouldn't last the dry season at full
24x7 drawdown and it generates about a 1000 Mwatt running full-out,
assuming it had enough rain during the wet season to fill it, which
happened this year, but is quite unusual).

Any sane energy policy would include nuclear[*], natural gas, coal with
carbon sequestration and river-based hydro for baseload augmented by
wind and solar (both of which are unpredictable sources); with
gas and hydro peakers.

scott

[*] the idea that one must store waste for 10,000 years is quite
silly. Anything that highly radioactive is a fuel source itself,
and reprocessing is perfectly viable. Not to mention thorium
fuel cycles which don't create high-level waste with long half-lives.

I have only one objection to what you said, and would agree with you if you can answer one question. Once you capture the CO2, what are you going to do with it?

As a chemist and per government papers I received from Senator Lugar there are a couple of solutions:

1. Put it into the depths of the ocean which per the greenhousers is already increasing in acid.

2. Store it as a compressed liquid, which is an ecological disaster in itself. Remember the lake in Africa that turned over releasing CO2. The 100% kill zone for that event was hundreds of square miles around the lake.

3. Store it as a salt, (Sodium, Calcium, other metal) per our environmental laws these are hazardous waste and must be treated as such. Which would required to be monitoring for hundreds of years in the future.

For every 12 ton of carbon burned, 44 tons of CO2 will be produced, or if captured as a salt, for every 12 tons of carbon burned over 100 tons of salts will be produced (if it is run through a drying process, if it leaves the plant wet or as a liquid the numbers go up significantly)

To put it another way for every 12 rail cars of carbon going into the plant, 100 rail cars of waste will be coming out.

As I remember a couple of years ago National Geographics said there was about 8 billion tons of coal burned ever year.

That will require one mammoth hazardous waste storage site.


.



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