Re: Tom Brady: Potentially bigger story than LBJ?



On Jun 3, 8:45 am, JeffH <redsoxpatriot...@xxxxxxx> wrote:
On Jun 2, 1:00 pm,JasonTodd <janklowic...@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:





TomBrady(notes) is back in Boston this week, participating in
offseason training activities for the New England Patriots and
preparing for what he hopes will be another Super Bowl run. While most
of the region’s sports fans are immersing themselves in the NBA Finals
and chanting “Beat L.A.,” New England’s most beloved sports hero will
be a fixture at the Pats’ training facility in Foxborough, planning to
hang around at least through the team’s June 15-17 minicamp.

 http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news;_ylt=AktFqr_BC0u2bskVbKYlA1Or0op4?sl...

(David J. Phillip/AP Photo)
 ThenBradywill likely return to Los Angeles, where he has spent the
bulk of his time since the Pats’ 33-14 playoff defeat to the Baltimore
Ravens last January, and where he and his wife, supermodel Gisele
Bundchen, are having a sizeable home built.

Related CoverageMoss not in Pats' plans? More From Michael SilverMays
not holding grudge against Carroll May 28, 2010 Arcane restriction
delays deal for Woodley May 25, 2010 Make no mistake – there has been
a cool distance betweenBrady, who turns 33 in August, and the
organization over the past few months, and not just of the physical
variety.

Entering the final year of the $60 million contract he signed before
the 2005 season,Bradywould seem to be in line for a lucrative
extension that would make him one of the league’s highest-paid
players. Yet three months before the start of the 2010 campaign, and
less than two months before training camp, there have been no
substantial talks between his agents (Don Yee and Steve Dubin) and the
Pats’ front office, and there’s a growing sense of disconnect between
the two camps.

Bradydeclined to comment, saying he is uncomfortable discussing the
subject. Last week New England owner Robert Kraft expressed confidence
that the two sides would get a deal done, telling the Boston Globe,
“We’re very lucky to have him as our quarterback and we want him to be
our quarterback for a long time into the future.”

However, wanting something to happen and making it so financially are
two different animals, and some people close toBradyfeel the
organization isn’t displaying much urgency toward ensuring the latter..
Conversely, the Patriots’ brass, now experiencing a third consecutive
offseason in which their California-raised quarterback has spent a
sizeable chunk of time away from the team’s facility, would probably
welcome some assurances that the quarterback is content to remain on
the East Coast.

It would help if the two sides started talking, but right now there is
insecurity in the air. With the specter of a work stoppage following
the 2010 season looming,Brady’ssituation seems entwined with the
uncertain labor landscape, to the point where he could be angling
toward prospective free agency after a new collective bargaining
agreement is reached.

My instincts tell me this is a remote possibility.Bradyand Kraft
have a strong relationship and a mutual appreciation for one another’s
contributions toward the franchise’s decade-long run as the NFL’s most
successful franchise. And even though there’s no guarantee that teams
will still be allowed to retain the rights of at least one
unrestricted free agent via the “franchise” tag once the current CBA
expires, it’s hard to imagine Kraft, one of the league’s most powerful
owners, signing off on a deal that could expose him to the departure
of his best player.

Chances are,Bradywill remain with the Pats long past 2010, and this
will go down as a business-driven blip in their relationship.

Yet the Patriots, more than many franchises, seem to be making a
concerted effort toward minimizing costs heading into the final year
of the current CBA, andBrady, the team’s assistant player rep, is at
least nominally aligned with the NFL Players Association as it
prepares for a possible lockout. It’s hard not to view the apparent
stagnation inBrady’scontract talks through the prism of labor
uncertainty.

From the team’s perspective, New England’s loyalty toBradyhas been
unwavering since he became the starter in 2001 and guided the Pats to
the first of three Super Bowl triumphs in four seasons. Even after
Bradytore up his knee in the first game of 2008, and backup Matt
Cassel(notes) performed well as his replacement, the organization
declined to entertain speculative trade offers for the 2007 league
MVP, instead applying the franchise tag to Cassel and dealing him to
Kansas City.

Brady, however, can’t help but notice the way that the only NFL
quarterback who can be considered his peer, Peyton Manning(notes), has
been treated by the Colts’ ownership.

Manning, who signed a reported $99.2 million contract extension in
2004 that will void after the 2010 season, looks to be in line for
another unprecedented payday: Last February, five days before the
Colts’ Super Bowl XLIV defeat to the New Orleans Saints, Indy owner
Jimmy Irsay said of a contract extension, “You know it’s going to get
done. I think it’s clear, and we’ll start on it this summer. … And
it’ll be the biggest [contract] in history; there’s not much doubt
about that.”

Contrast that with the comments Kraft made to reporters in March at
the NFL owner meetings in Orlando about a potentialBradyextension:
“Great things happen in life if you’re flexible and not rigid. … We’re
balancing a lot of different factors in an unknown environment. We’re
not sleeping. It’s just complicated.”

He is not going anywhere, he will be resigned soon.. They aren't
lettingTomBradywalk out that door- Hide quoted text -


Still nothing...

Tom Brady is in camp, but that doesn't mean he's happy.

Brady has been letting it leak out that he's unhappy with his contract
situation with the New England Patriots.

The question isn't whether or not the New England front office will
sign Brady to a new contract, but just how long that contract is going
to be, and how much guaranteed money will be featured.

Anyone who objectively follows Head Coach Bill Belichick's career
should know by now that the moment he thinks a player has passed his
prime, he will not hesitate to cut ties with said player and move on.

Ask Bernie Kosar and Drew Bledsoe if you don't believe that last
statement.

Ask any number of ex-Patriots what they think about Belichick's
draconian roster-shaping methods.

Here are the facts: Tom Brady now is 32 years old, he's blown out his
knee and the Patriots are in for a year or two of re-tooling to rehab
various parts of the team.

Belichick stockpiles draft picks like new parents hoard diapers, so
finding a new quarterback at any point in the draft will not be an
issue for Belichick.

Plus, you have to figure the Matt Cassell experience into this
scenario. Belichick managed to get a pretty good season out of the
largely untested USC quarterback, who actually performed better than
the guy who played ahead of him in college, Matt Leinart.

With the millions Brady already is making, many people have to wonder
why he is so unhappy with his situation. The answer is Brady has
deferred reworking his contract in favor of the team bringing in other
pieces to help win another Super Bowl.

But now Peyton Manning is getting a new contract while Donovan McNabb,
Drew Brees and others are seeking contract extensions. The last few
years have featured rookie quarterbacks getting spectacular new
contracts, and Brady isn't getting any younger.

Belichick holds no loyalty to any player, no matter what they've done
for him in the past. Even if he's shown a softer side toward a few
players, that's only because he thought they still could contribute.

Don't get it wrong, Belichick still wants Brady there this year, and
probably next year. But, three years down the road is forever in NFL
years, and Belichick may not want to commit to a four or five-year
contract on Brady, especially after having one knee reconstructed.

While Brady is still "the man" in New England entering 2010, go ask
Bledsoe how fast that can change, and then stop asking yourself why
Brady wants a contract done sooner rather than later.


********

Jason Todd


.



Relevant Pages

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  • Re: Tom Brady: Potentially bigger story than LBJ?
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    (rec.sport.pro-wrestling)
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  • Re: More Manning-Brady
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    (alt.sports.football.pro.ne-patriots)