Re: Histogram issues with low end Canon - 300d





"ronviers@xxxxxxxxx" wrote:

ColinD wrote:
"ronviers@xxxxxxxxx" wrote:

ColinD wrote:
"ronviers@xxxxxxxxx" wrote:

Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!) wrote:
On 12 Jun 2006 11:26:19 -0700, in rec.photo.digital "ronviers@xxxxxxxxx"
<ronviers@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:

I am very dependent on the histogram for exposure. It was explained to
me per this group that I should expose keeping my information close to
the right side of the histogram because of the added attention given to
that area by the ADC. Fine. I have been very careful about doing that
but I have began to notice that when I load my pictures into my editing
software that even though I have been careful to leave a small gap on
the right side to keep the information from clipping (terminology?) the
highlights, I find I have still over exposed the picture. It
especially shows up when I look at a multichannel histogram. In fact,
if I take a picture of a red flower the red channel will aways be
clipped. A blue flower, blue will be clipped. Ok, I can get used to
that. What I am wondering is it common for the nicer cameras to have a
multichannel histograms? Is this a problem with only the lowest end
(300d) Canon cameras? Maybe it is even a problem specific to my
camera? Can anyone tell me if they have noticed a misleading histogram
with their Canon cameras?

This is a well know issue with luminance histograms. Same for the Nikon
D70. The D200 however has the ability to also display and RGB histogram.
I'd imagine the higher end Canon's would have a similar ability.
--
Ed Ruf (Usenet2@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx)
http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index.html

Hi Ed, Thanks for the update. I think it is pretty bogus for Canon not
to mention that in the manual. Sorry to drag up a well known issue, I
should have checked the archive.

Brgds, Ron

This problem is also exacerbated by shooting jpeg images, where the
camera processes the image, reducing the image from 12 to 8 bits per
channel, and introduciong clipping during the operation. Shoot in RAW
and use a good converter and you will have much better highlight
retention.

Colin D.

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

That is good advice. The good news is that all of my pictures are
shot in raw but the bad news is that I have a years worth of things
like turtles and flowers that really suffer from clipped colors because
the areas that are clipped are usually things like the reds of the
turtles legs and face. Some of these pictures were difficult to get
and some are not too bad so it is a little depressing. I have just
entered into my learn-to-edit phase as I have been holding out for CS2
and only just got it, which is how I learned about the clipping (ACR).
Of course this is my fault for not understanding more about photography
but I have learned much more trivial life lessons at far greater
prices, so I will get over it. It has lowered my estimation of Canon
somewhat.

Thanks,
Ron

Congrats on getting CS2, I am still with ver 7, CS2 in this country (New
Zealand) is about $NZ 1400, so it'll be a while ...

Some RAW converters will retain some highlight detail even if only one
channel remains unblown, maybe most do, with suitable settings, though I
don't know in detail about others than DxO Optics, which I use here.
One can set the level of highlight retention in that program as
desired. Like you, I find that reds are the most prone to clip. I have
some shots of Australian parrots that are really brilliant red, but the
feather detail is lost, and they are jpegs from when I first got the
camera {:-(

As for Canon as a brand, (I have the 300D as well), it's no worse, and
probably better than the comparable competition. There are a couple of
Nikons (a D100 and a D70) and another two Canon 350Ds at my camera
group, and there isn't much between them, though I feel the Canons are
ahead by a nose for gradation and smooth tones. The Nikons are sexier
to handle, but the results are no better than my 300D.

Cheers,

Colin D.

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

I just realized you said New Zealand not Australia. I have no idea
what made me think Australia. Sorry. I have no idea what the flora
and fauna must be like in New Zealand. I am sorry for not knowing. I
would love to go. I would have never guessed an Island so far south
would have parrots. I promise to read up on it.

Take care,
Ron

Simple answer to that, Ron. I am in NZ, but we holidayed in Oz last
year - but some parrots have made it here from Oz. We also have NZ
parrots, but their colors are drab green and brown, not very spectacular
like the Oz birds.

Colin D.

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

.



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