Re: Indoor Shooting and Lead Exposure



On Jan 10, 3:56 am, Bluehawk99 <Bluehaw...@xxxxxxx> wrote:
# # Don't you remember all news about Chinese toys imported to the U.S.
# # painted with lead paint 3-6 months ago? �There is a very good reason
# # those toys were recalled: �lead is bad for humans. �When was the last
# # time you saw LEADED gas? �Why? �Lead is bad for humans.
#
# The reason they were recalled was because they were toys and children
# tend to put toys in their mouth!
# Many paints still contain lead today in the US and legally so but are
# forbidden to be used in certain commercial applications...such as
# toys.
# #
# # I worked for an engineering firm which did lead remediation, which is
# # why I know this stuff.
#
# In what capacity?
#
# No, just installing a strong fan won't do it.
# # (probably make the problem worse) �Fortunately lead remediation is
# # possible and pretty straight forward, leave it to the pros.
#
# Indoor ranges use exhaust fans and seperate recirculating air
# conditioners...how is that much different then the OP useing an
# exhaust fan in the window of his basement??
#


O.K. Bluehawk99,

Your questions indicate to me that you are truly out of your depth.

Never fear! Lemme see if I can help you out.

Up to 1977 paint mfrs. could us lead in paint @ .5% level (by weight)
or less. Chronic exposure to this paint at this level causes moderate
to severe mental and physical retardation in children. Bad for adults
too - organ failure, CNS problems. People die(d) from this. Millions
of people have had their life cut short or altered by chronic lead
exposure.

Read this: http://www.nsc.org/library/facts/lead.htm Basicly, it
tells you ingestable lead is bad for you, yet quite common.

Post 1977 paint mfrs. had to cut lead content to .06% level (by
weight)or less. (CPSC ruling)

Read this: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml77/77096.html
(Later expanded in 1992)

Chronic lead exposure at this level is considered "safe" for humans.
Currently, most 1st world paint mfrs. use NO lead in their paints.
(Except for some specialty/industrial applications.) They just don't
want the liability issues.

Now, apply a little math: 128 oz in a gal. .5% of 128=.64 oz 473.5
grains to the ounce, 281.28 grains of lead is needed to equal the
lead poisoning capacity of lead paint, which we all know is bad for
you.

281.28 grains of lead works to just better than 7 .22lr bullets. Not
many, is it?

But wait! .22lr aren't near as efficient as paint for spreading lead
dust around because most of the bullet is intact. True, but the OP
says 300-350 rounds a week shot (For how long?) and we haven't even
thought about the lead oxides found in the primers. Lead dust from the
basement WILL infiltrate the rest of the house. Might be a good idea
to get the house checked, make sure the place you live isn't killing
ya.

So, lets talk about sticking a fan in the window.

Typical household 20" fan can move roughly 900 cubic feet per min.
(CFM) But, this is only half the story. The fan can move 900 CFM
only if there is an additional 900 CFM of air is introduced into the
room, above the rooms basic volume. (This is a simplified example, we
ignore gravity, friction of air...etc..) Otherwise, the fan chops at
the air and creates massive convections BEHIND the fan. This means it
will make the lead dust airborn in the unventilated basement, greatly
increasing the chances of accidental ingestion and dust infiltration
to the rest of the structure.

Now lets suppose, by some miracle, the fan is actually moving 900 CFM
of air out of the basement. Where does it go? Out in your yard,
waiting for you to ingest it when you cut the grass. Waiting for you
to track it back into the house, infiltrating your house through
doors, windows, soffit vents, heater vents and the like. Otherwise,
the wind gets to pick it up and give it to your lovely neighbors next
door, across the street, up the block. Got kids who play in the
yard?? Swimming pool? Or even just down wind, talk about liability!
Not an ideal solution.

On indoor ranges, ventilation and lead abatement are the heaviest
costs. Takes a lot of electricity to run ventilation and the air
scrubbers. Yup, air scrubbers. You can't just exhust lead in the air
like that, EPA has a fit! Nope, you've got to remove most of the
airborn lead before it gets exhausted. Air scrubbers are various
types of filtration to remove airborn lead. Plus, you've got a lot of
air to move to get the lead dust to the scrubbers.

Bluehawk99, I stand by my original post.

Trumpet


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