Re: for instance: you say...



On Nov 20, 11:15 am, "Koolchi...@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx"
<john.kulczy...@xxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
On Nov 20, 9:24 am, Mark <blueriver...@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:





On Nov 19, 8:43 pm, "Koolchi...@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx"

<john.kulczy...@xxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
On Nov 19, 5:56 pm, Mark <blueriver...@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:

On Nov 19, 7:58 am, "Koolchi...@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx"

<john.kulczy...@xxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
On Nov 18, 10:53 pm, Mark <blueriver...@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:

Ok, I went ahead and combined the 2
into a new problem, which, for this group
is impossible to not know the answer, and
you know why?

Because I already told you!

---

Given a mean sea level designated as A,
if a distance of 1,173 ft is required for a
plane to take off when the temperature is
73 degrees F, and 1,356 ft when the temp.
is 86 degrees F, then what distance is required
when the temp. is 79.5 degrees, and given
a different elevation (B) in which a distance of
1,173 ft. is required for takeoff when the temp.
is 70 degrees F, and 1,356 ft.when the temp.
is 80 degrees, then at 75 degrees, what is
the difference in takeoff distance between
the two elevations?

---
Mark

Is the relative humidity the same in both cases? Relative humidity is
rarely the same for two locations even if they are at simmilar
elevations. so even if the jest of your problem is to explain the idea
of "sameness" for a and b, in reality they are different due to other
factors.

My point here is to never fly "air Mark".-

For instance, you say you have a point of criticism,
based on your (mis)perceived point of logic, that
being, that in my given scenerios all variables of
flight are not taken into consideration,

and yet it escapes you that...

you've already been given the data which encompasses
the performance based on that set of circumstances.
So based on those included values, you are asked to
calculate one more distance. Therefore your arguement
is misplaced and incorrect.

In other words:

For instance, because in all examples you are
already given 2 other take-off distances and
temperatures, and are simply asked to calculate
the intermediate values, then it would follow that
aspects of the problem not included in the math,
or possible to change in real life outside of the
included circumstances within real time, would
be considered by anyone of intelligence above
a rube.

---
Mark

It is simply that you assume that you are right when you are wrong
that makes you think you are right.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -

And it's obvious that you try to build support
for your assertions by skewing the original set
of circumstances beyond reality, such that
you continue to embellish the subsequent
false premises which you've fabricated on
unsubstantiated reasoning beyond
corroberration.

You do that a lot you know. You're not a bad
guy, but somewhere along the line I think you
dropped one too many hits of blotter, not
that there's anything wrong with that.

---
Mark

But your nonsense is that you are trying to establish a difference in
the reader's mind between two homgenous location as you have set out
in your problem. If they are homgenous location (A = B) then what is
the point of the question?- Hide quoted text -

No, your complaint is that I have committed an error of
not incorporating other variables into the scenerio, by
your own words...relative humidity.

But you're wrong, because, humidity, and many, many
other variables which you aren't aware of (and I am),
don't matter, as they remain constant with respect to
both take-offs at their respective altitudes.

If it took the plane 1,173 ft, at 70 degrees, (elevation A)
And it took the plane 1,356 ft. at 80 degrees, (elevation A),
Then why would you suddenly want to start incorporating
extraneous unknowns, ie, humidity, center of gravity,
wind direction, prop pitch, time of day, weather,
sexual preference, etc., etc., ad nauseum?

You are wrong.

No one wanders out of the periphery of relevant
data to consider the solution when it isn't
germane to the given variables necessary
to reach a specific known.

Unless the rubic's cube was named
after them.

---
Mark
Livin' on Tulsa Time



.



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