Re: AIRLINE LAUGHS



Old Salt wrote:
On Tue, 06 Mar 2007 12:35:30 -0800 the fame writer, nick c wrote not
much to be useful on, "Re: AIRLINE LAUGHS",
Hmm ... no, not really, Mark. An A&E license (Aircraft & Engines maintenance license) takes about 2 years of technical training to become training certified and then must pass a tough civil examination before he/she is granted an A&E license and can sign-off work done to an aircraft.

Did he go to collage, no, did he pass high school more likely.
Yes one does need a tech school to do the job as one would to be a
chief. But one only needs to be a high school gragerate and no
collage is need to be a chief, so a chief just as a aircraft mechanic
only need a high school diploma, same goes for car machanic. Once does
NOT count tech schools when talking about an education. But yes for
many jobs one needs to attend a tech school that teaches what the
person is going for.


Times have changed but I remember when A&E licensed mechanics could take apart, repair, and reassemble conventional gasoline aircraft engines, rig control cables in accordance with expected climatic temperature changes, test, strip, and/or recover (re-fabric) aircraft, repair primary as well as secondary structure, fabricate structural parts, remove-replace, re-rig and test control surfaces (which includes testing for and repairing 'cable pull-off'), test and repair electrical systems (black box exchange and test) and mechanical (hydraulic) systems, and just about be a Jack-Of-All-Trades type of person as applicable to general aircraft. For a fee, they would also overview work, inspect and sign-off work, that others may do to aircraft who were not licensed mechanics. But for dang sure, they weren't anything like auto mechanics.

I've only known two people who were A&E licensed mechanics, as well as pilots and licensed flight instructors. Both went to Northrup Aviation Institute. I don't recall either one *not* being technically capable of normally repairing conventional type aircraft. As for their formal education, both had completed high school. Both later worked for the FAA and later retired. But that was a long time ago, way back in the 50's.

.



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