Re: Garnett (mother of Lord Jeffreys)



So, is Gilbert Edward George Lariston Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound also the
the Sixth Earl of Minto?

Lady Frances Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound was the second wife of Lord John
Russell, the Liberal Prime Minister

4 articles:
Hawick News September 8, 2005 HEADLINE: Earl's death the 'end of an
era'
THE sad death of Lord Minto this week has been described as the "end of
an era" by local minister Rev Anthony Jones. The Rt Hon. The Earl of
Minto OBE JP, whose full name was Gilbert Edward George Lariston
Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound, died on Wednesday following a long illness.
He was aged 87. Known as "Gibbie" to his friends and acquaintances
throughout the Borders, Scotland and across the world, the death of
Lord Minto has drawn tributes which pay compliment to a well-liked and
well-respected man. Speaking to the 'News' local minister for Hobkirk
and Southdean, Rev Anthony Jones said: "Everyone knew him and he was a
well-loved figure that meant a lot to the community. He was very
friendly, helpful and down-to-earth, he was very much man-to-man with
everyone although he was Lord Minto." Born on 19 June 1928, Lord Minto
was educated at Eton and the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst. He
served in the Scots Guards from 1946 and was commissioned in 1948,
serving in the Malay campaign until 1951. After that he was ADC to the
Commander in Chief Far East Land Forces 1951; ADC to Chief of the
Imperial General Staff, ADC to Governer and Commander in Chief of
Cyprus 1955 and retired from HM Armed Forces in 1956. In public life he
held many offices, including the Ensign of the Queens Body Guard for
Scotland (the Royal Company of Archers). And as a member of the Borders
Regional Council from 1974 until 1996, he became Convener of the
Council for those last six years. The council yesterday (Thursday)
issued a statement which said: "The members and officers of Scottish
Borders Council wish to express their profound sympathies and
condolences to the family of Lord Minto." Rev Anthony Jones, who will
conduct the funeral service at Minto Kirk on Monday at 2pm, concluded:
"He was a large part of life here, he always kept in touch with what
was happening in Minto and Denholm. "His death will certianly leave a
gap in the community that will never be replaced." Lord Minto, the 6th
Earl of Minto, is survived by his son, daughter and five grandchildren.


The Herald (Glasgow) September 9, 2005 SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 13
HEADLINE: Earl of Minto, ambassador for the Borders, dies after short
illness
LORD MINTO: Convener of the regional council for six years.
TRIBUTES have been paid to a Scots peerwho has died after a short
illness.
The Earl of Minto, 77, served for 22 years as a councillor in the
Scottish Borders. He was convener of Borders Regional Council from
1990 to 1996, as well as representing the authority on a number of
bodies in Scotland. Lord Minto, or "Gibbie" to friends and
acquaintances, also played a leading role in organising the Queen's
Golden Jubilee celebrations in the Borders three years ago. Alasdair
Hutton, convener of Scottish Borders Council, said: "He was one of the
best liked and most effective heads of the council." Gilbert Edward
George Lariston Elliot-Murray Kynynmound, the 6th Earl of Minto, was
born on June 19, 1928. He was educated at Eton and the Royal Military
Academy at Sandhurst. He served in the Scots Guards and retired from
the armed forces in 1958. He was Ensign of the Queen's Body Guard for
Scotland (the Royal Company of Archers). He was chairman, and later
president, of the Scottish Council on Alcohol, deputy traffic
commissioner for Scotland from 1975 to 1981, commissioner with the
Local Government Property Commission (Scotland) from 1995 and president
of the South of Scotland Chamber of Commerce from 1980-82. Lord Minto
received the Military MBE in 1955 and the OBE in 1986. He served as a
JP for Roxburghshire from 1961 onwards, and was deputy lieutenant for
Roxburgh, Ettrick and Lauderdale from 1983. He is survived by his son,
daughter and five grandchildren.

The Herald (Glasgow) September 9, 2005 SECTION: FEATURES; Pg. 20
HEADLINE: Earl of Minto; Laird who devoted his life to public service
THE Earl of Minto was the local laird who also happened to be convener
of Borders Regional Council and therefore the most powerful local
government figure throughout southern Scotland. That he also wished to
demolish his own ancestral home created an extremely delicate
situation. The fact that the house was also a listed building and
beloved of conservationists produced a tightrope that inevitably
snapped - with the result that Minto House became a pile of rubble. For
all his Borders leadership - he devoted his life to public service -
his name is inevitably tied to the fall of the House of Minto.
Thrice-married "Gibbie" Minto, soldier, businessman, public servant and
laird, was never less than colourful. He waded his way through the
civic morass of Cosla (the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities),
picking and choosing his friends, but making ready allies wherever he
needed them. "He was an absolute diplomat and a complete gentleman, "
said one of his fellow conveners at the time. "It made no difference
who you were, not even some of the gey roch lads from west central
Scotland." Before a Cosla meeting in Dundee, he came on a councillor
colleague and ushered her into a sitting room. "The old pile . . ." he
said, referring to Minto House. "I haven't the money, and no-one will
give me a grant. I took the roof off, and now they're afterme." In
1992, "they" certainly were. The secretary of state for Scotland
stepped in with listed building protection to prevent Lord Minto from
knocking it down. Work halted, but days laterBorders Regional Council,
of which Lord Minto was convener, replied with a dangerous building
notice and the demolition men arrived back on site. For the 80 souls in
the beautiful Borders village of Minto, nearHawick, the saga brought
the UK press to their doorstep. This is solid Minto territory where
most of the village used to belong to Minto lairds, the Minto Hills
form the background, the course is Minto Golf Club and where natives
are baptised, married and buried in Minto Kirk. But the family had not
lived at the William Adam-designed home since Gibbie was 16. His actual
home was a nearby farm. The house had become a girls' school, and then
lain empty. A plan to ship the house stone by stone to Japan fell
victim to recession in the Far East. When no use could be found for it,
Lord Minto suffered his own council's building control officer being
called in. Gibbie Minto headed a family which had had a recognised head
at least from the time of King Robert the Bruce. Anciently they held
for the monarch that part of the border facing England known as "the
Middle March". He was proud of his line, mentioning to one councillor
at a reception that "the quality of my lineage is far better than the
Queen's". He could recite from memory the ancient rhyme attributing
various Elliot branches according to spellings of the surname. The
chiefship descends from 1584 through the line of Elliot of Stobs.
Gilbert Elliot of Stobs was convicted of treason in 1685 for plotting
against the Catholic Duke of York, but was pardoned, and underWilliam
of Orange in 1689 was knighted, made a judge and created Lord Minto.
His granddaughter, the poet Jane Elliot of Minto (1727-1805), was
author of the best version of the traditional song The Flooers o' the
Forest, lamenting Scots losses at the Battle of Flodden in 1513. Lord
Minto's ancestor, Gilbert 4th Earl of Minto (18451914), broke his neck
riding in the Grand National. He recovered, and went on to become
governor-general of Canada before succeeding Lord Curzon as viceroy of
India in 1905. Family elevation to the peerage came in 1813, then the
1st earl was given his title for his part in Corsica being ceded to the
UK at the end of the eighteenth century. As a special heraldic honour,
the earls of Minto were granted the augmentation of the arms of Corsica
at the top of their shield - the couped head of a Moor. "Mildly But
Firmly", the translation of Latin Minto motto, marked the style of
Gibbie Minto's approach to public service. Over the ultimate fate of
Minto House, few reproached him, with most glad that the misfortune of
the fate of the place had not landed on their personal doorsteps. Minto
himself gave 22 years of service as a councillor in the Borders and
proved an active ambassador for the area, playing a leading role in
organising the Queen's golden jubilee celebrations in the Borders three
years ago. When in 1993, there were threats by the then British Rail to
withdraw Scotland-London sleeper services, Gibbie Minto ensured that
Borders stood firm with all of Scotland's nine regional councils in
opposing the axe. Such was the quality of his support that the nine
conveners, led by Rhona Kemp of Grampian, not only halted cuts, but
gained the headquartership of Anglo-Scottish sleeper services from
London to Glasgow. Educated at Eton and the Royal Military Academy at
Sandhurst, Lord Minto served in the Scots Guards until 1958. In 1955 he
was appointed a military MBE. His many honorary offices include being a
lieutenant of the Royal Company of Archers (Queen's Bodyguard in
Scotland). His public appointments included chairmanship of the
Scottish Council on Alcohol for 14 years from 1973, being a
commissioner of the Local Government Property Commission (Scotland)
from 1995 and president of the South of Scotland Chamber of Commerce
from 1980 to 1982. The earl was awarded the OBE in 1986. He served as a
JP for Roxburghshire from 1961 onwards and was vice-lord lieutenant
forRoxburgh, Ettrick and Lauderdale. Lord Minto married first Lady
Caroline ChildVilliers, daughter of the Earl of Jersey; second, Mary
Ballantine; and third Caroline Godfrey. He died in a nursing home near
Kelso, and is survived by his son, daughter, five grandchildren and
step-children. He is succeeded by his 51-year-old son Gilbert, Viscount
Melgund. Gilbert Edward George Lariston Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound OBE
JP, soldier, businessman, public servant and laird; born June 19, 1928,
died September 7, 2005.

The Herald (Glasgow) September 10, 2005 SECTION: FEATURES; Pg. 14
HEADLINE: In memoriam;
Earl of Minto Born June 19, 1928, died September 7, 2005. Former
convener of Borders regional council the Earl of Minto, known to his
many friends as Gibbie, served as a councillor in the area formore than
22 years. An enthusiastic ambassador for the Borders, he represented
the council on a number of bodies throughout Scotland. Gilbert Edward
George Lariston Elliot-Murray Kynynmound was educated at Eton and the
Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst. After serving with the Scots
Guards he embarked on a different form of public service which, in
addition to local authority work, included the Scottish Council on
Alcohol, the Traffic Commissioners and South of Scotland Chamber of
Commerce. In the early nineties he was involved in a brief but
colourful controversy over the demolition of Minto House, a listed
building designed by William Adam, but which had not been the family
home for nearly half a century. As sixth earl he had several
illustrious ancestors. The family, who can trace lineage back to Robert
the Bruce, was elevated to the peerage in 1813, when the 1st earl was
given his title for his part in Corsica being ceded to the UK. Gilbert
4th Earl of Minto (18451914) broke his neck riding in the Grand
National. He recovered and went on to become governor-general of Canada
before succeeding Lord Curzon as viceroy of India in 1905.

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