Re: I have been CHALLENGED. . .



EMB <embtwo@xxxxxxxxx> writes:

John F. Eldredge wrote:
I once saw the aftermath of a fatal accident where a woman yielded
the right-of-way to one fire truck, then pulled out as soon as it
went by, only to be hit by a second fire truck that was traveling
only seconds behind the first truck. I suspect that such wrecks are
all too common. I have also heard of emergency vehicles colliding
with each other, since each driver was expecting that everyone else
would get out of their way.


SOP for us was to always leave at least 15 seconds between fire trucks
travelling the same route so as to avoid precisely that occurrence.

Some years ago, I did the prep for an "advanced" motorcycling course (purely
voluntary - it's just about staying alive, rather than about getting your
licence).

One of the things they were hot on was "observation links" - basically
inferring what you can't see from what you can. We were being quizzed
on that one night; it was mostly predictable stuff like

ice-cream van => children;
equine by-product in road => horse and rider around next corner[1].

Then the guy sprang "fire engine" on us. There were lots of blank looks,
and a few guesses along the lines of "smoke obscuring vision" and "people
gathering to rubberneck". Eventually someone came up with the answer:
"another fire engine".

Julian.

[1] The extension to bovine by-product is too obvious to mention.
.



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