Re: How useful is a serger



Sounds like you're a volunteer professional! I definitely want
finished seams but didn't realize a serger cuts as it sews. Thanks for
the note of caution.

Cindy wrote:
Moanna,

I am far from a professional as you can get :). Yet, when my serger is down
for the count, I find it almost impossible to sew. Since I really have
issues with loose threads and unraveling fabrics, my serger works wonders
for this. Plus the fact I can cut and overlock faster then plain sewing
stitch with much nicer results. (plus the fact you dont have to press open
your seams like you do when regular stitching on a sewing machine.

The down side to a serger?
1. Learning the threading pattern of the machine. It is tricky and very
unforgiving. Yet once you learn the threading pattern it is a breeze.
2. When you screw up on a serger, you can make some very costly mistakes. On
a regular sewing machine it is not too bad, you simply pulling the stitching
out and re-sew, not a problem most of the time. On a serger you are both
cutting the material and overlocking at the same time. If your seams are off
you could really have a problem. Example: I was serging a full floor length
velvet cape with satin lining, binding the outside ( velvet) to the inside
(satin) unbeknownst to me, some satin from the middle of the garment had
gotten caught up and pulled through with the intended seam. Result : a good
15 inch cut right down the center of the garment.

You could have heard me screaming from a mile away. I had to totaly take the
entire cape apart, buy new satin, recut the pattern, now taking in an extra
5/8 allowence from the extra that had been serged off and reserge the entire
cape. The worst part is this was not for myself yet a friend who had paid a
massive amount of money for good velvet and and outstanding type of satin. I
paid of course for the new satin as this was my mistake.

Moral of the story: Sergers are wonderful things to have, but when you screw
up on one it can be worse than any sewing machine ever thought of doing.
Yet I wouldnt be without one.


Cindy

.



Relevant Pages

  • Re: How useful is a serger
    ... when my serger is down ... your seams like you do when regular stitching on a sewing machine. ... velvet cape with satin lining, binding the outside to the inside ... entire cape apart, buy new satin, recut the pattern, now taking in an extra ...
    (alt.sewing)
  • Re: Qs for the serger owners here
    ... I'm entertaining purchasing a serger. ... I have owned several in my time, and currently have two, a Brother 1034D ... seams and edges with three or four threads. ... same goes for those that do a cover stitch hem. ...
    (rec.crafts.textiles.quilting)
  • Re: Qs for the serger owners here
    ... I'm entertaining purchasing a serger. ... I have owned several in my time, and currently have two, a Brother 1034D and a Bernins 1150MDA. ... The Bernina is a 2/3/4 thread serger, which means it will do very fine seams, rolled edges and neatenings with 2 threads as well as 3 or 4 threads. ... The same goes for those that do a cover stitch hem. ...
    (rec.crafts.textiles.quilting)
  • Re: t.v. sewing and quilting shows
    ... to buy a serger and the materials needed. ... since T-shirt fabrics don't ravel. ... Vertical seams in jersey tend to press themselves open. ... fits in one knit may look like a tent or a sausage skin in another, ...
    (alt.sewing)
  • Re: Serger
    ... I serged the seams in the back of the quilts I made for my young ... The post serger kids quilts are all fine. ... baby blankets much faster than you thought! ...
    (rec.crafts.textiles.quilting)