Re: The little voices inside my head won't be quiet!!



Cliff <Clhuprich@xxxxxxx> wrote in
news:2llek11ikhcgfg60n48dne3crc9nvsooa1@xxxxxxx:

> On 8 Oct 2005 01:04:53 GMT, D Murphy <spamto154@xxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
>
>>Cliff <Clhuprich@xxxxxxx> wrote in
>>news:hngdk1dl6c6qten0uggp0gshgfqcjqc5ic@xxxxxxx:
>>
>>> On Fri, 07 Oct 2005 00:23:34 GMT, BottleBob <bottlbob@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>>> BTW, Don't tell the one what Chromium Steel is or that it's not
>>>>> actually used to make jet engine turbine blades from.
>>>>
>>>> Chrome steel? You mean like a steel alloy with Chromium in it?
>>>>
>>>>=========================================================
>>>>http://www.environmentaleducationohio.org/Biosphere/Case%20Studies/mi
>>>>ne rals.html
>>>>
>>>> Chromium, when mixed with other metals, gives them the
>>>> sought-after
>>>>qualities of hardness and resistance to high temperatures, wear, and
>>>>oxidation. Combined with nickel, aluminum, cobalt or titanium,
>>>>chromium forms superalloys able to withstand very high temperatures.
>>>>These alloys are used for products such as jet engine casings and
>>>>turbine blades, ball bearings, and high-speed drills.
>>>>==========================================================
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>==========================================================
>>>>http://www.falcon-metals.com/Nickel/NickelCharacteristics.htm
>>>>
>>>>Alloy 25
>>>>Haynes Co-20Cr-10BNi-15w-3Fe SUPERIOR STRENGTH AND GOOD
>>>>OXIDATION RESISTANCE AT TEMPERATURES TO 1800F
>>>>
>>>>JET ENGINE PARTS SUCH AS TURBINE BLADES, COMBUSTION CHAMBERS,
>>>>AFTER-BURNER PARTS. INDUSTRIAL FURNACE MUFFLES AND LINERS.
>>>>==========================================================
>>>>
>>>>==========================================================
>>>>http://www.ulbrich.com/stripmill/alloys/alloys.shtml
>>>>
>>>>HASTELLOY® X2
>>>>N06002
>>>>
>>>>Jet engine components for afterburner sections, blades, tailpipes.
>>>>Good strength and oxidation resistance to 2200°F.
>>>>
>>>>Ni+ - 48
>>>>C - .05 - .15
>>>>Mn - 1.00 MAX
>>>>Fe - 17.0 - 20.0
>>>>Si - 1.00 MAX
>>>>
>>>>Other
>>>> Cr - 20.5-23.0
>>>> W - .20-1.0
>>>> Mo - 8.0-10.0
>>>> Co - .50-2.5
>>>>==========================================================
>>>
>>> LOL .... You too, eh?
>>> And you work in what field, exactly?
>>
>>[High Performance Stainless Steels]
>>
>>http://www.stainless-steel-world.net/pdf/11021.pdf
>
> An intersting list but a few things might just be slightly
> miscatagorized I think, probably so as to be able to
> compare them more than anything else.
>
> Just because it says "High Performance Stainless Steels"
> does not make it so in all cases.

Translation - you know more than the trade mag for the Stainless steel
industry.

>
>>[Inconel® refers to a family of trademarked high strength austenitic
>>nickel-chromium-iron alloys
>
> Yep.
>
>>that have exceptional anti-corrosion and heat-
>>resistance properties. These alloys contain high levels of nickel and
>>can be thought of as super-stainless steels.] from
>
> "Can be thought of", not "are".

As defined by you? If a drawing lists the material as Stainless Steel per
UNS-NO7718, what will we be machining? How about if it says Stainless Steel
AMS 5662?

I'm curious, what would you classify A-286 as?

>
>><http://www.burnsstainless.com/TechArticles/Inconel_article/inconel_art
>>icle .html>
>>
>>
>>also see
>>
>><http://www.steelforge.com/infoservices/matoverview/mo_iron_superalloys
>>.asp
>>>
>>
>>[Inconel 625 and 718 Backing Steels] from
>>
>><http://www.wexco.com/Cylinder%20Backings.html>
>
> Sort of a trademark thing, "backing steels"? A bit of a
> misnomer of a *phrase* in some cases butthe materials
> in those cases serve a similar functional purpose.
>
>>I've seen it numerous times on drawings as well.
>
> Chromium Steel?

Corrosion resistant steel or stainless steel usually. But IIRC in other
countries stainless is of called chromium steel or chromium nickel steel.
Or heat resistant alloy steel - <http://www.viadrus.cz/odlitkyocel.asp?
j=en&param=1>

The guy you were getting spanked by lives where?

[Heat Resistant Steels]

<http://www.supplycorp.com.au/HeatResistantSteels/HeatResistantSteels.htm>

>
> Free clue #1: "Steels are Iron alloys with less than 2.11% carbon> by
weight".
> Free clue #2: Don't confuse with Nickel alloys <G>.

The U.S. government (DOT) calls it steel

[§ 178.47(b) Steel .Authorized material is Inconel 718 alloy conforming to
SAE Aerospace Material Specification (AMS) 5662. ]

http://tinyurl.com/8xvym

Also, not all blades are made from nickel based alloys. Some Cobalt Chrome
alloys are now being used.

>
> Somewhat interesting but a bit questionable (BB loves Wick)
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steel :
>
> [
> Currently there are several classes of steels in which carbon is
> replaced with other alloying materials, and carbon, if present, is
> undesired. A more recent definition is that steels are iron-based
> alloys that can be plastically formed (pounded, rolled, etc.).
>]

An online definition of what steel is doesn't disprove that nickel alloys
are often referred to as steels.


--

Dan

.