Mike, what is your conclusion? Re: value of good versus not good movements:



On Aug 16, 11:12 pm, "Jack Denver" <nunuv...@xxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
I should add that I consider the lack of fine regulator to be significant. I
know that pro watchmakers with timing machines and a delicate touch can
work directly from the curb regulator but I find the Etachron style to be
invaluable for trimming a few secs off a watch quickly and easily when I
want to get a watch "spot on" without visiting a pro, which I like to do
whenever it is possible. I especially like to do this because : 1.
Qualified watchmakers (as opposed to mall watch battery changing butchers)
today are as rare as hen's teeth. 2. When you do find one, typically the
attitude is "I'll do a complete service on your watch and charge you $150.
Come back in a month when it is finished." I can regulate an etachron watch
in less time than it would take me to drive to the corner store, no less 10
miles to the nearest watchmaker.

I've had the discussion with the pro's here before on why it is they can't
do partial services - must guaranty the job, water resistance, etc. etc. I
fully understand. But if I want to crack open the back, play with the
regulator and wreck the water resistance on my own damn watch, that's my
business.

At one time a "patent regulator" was considered a basic feature of every
high grade watch - I don't see why it should be omitted just to save a few
pennies, even in the age of the timing machine. Pros can still move the
main regulator directly if they want.



The Seiko 6R15 hacks and hand-winds. It's used in the "Spirit" line
(e.g. Ref. SCVS003) as well as the new mid-range diver (e.g. Ref.
SBDC001). It lacks a fine regulator adjustment, as I understand some
grades of 2824 have. It's otherwise comparable to the 2824, in my
opinion.

M

Having received so many detailed viewpoints, I just wonder what
finally your conclusion has been, and what kind of a watch you have
finally bought.

Appreciating in advance your kind answer. :-)

.



Relevant Pages

  • Re: value of good versus not good movements
    ... I should add that I consider the lack of fine regulator to be significant. ... invaluable for trimming a few secs off a watch quickly and easily when I ... want to get a watch "spot on" without visiting a pro, ... Qualified watchmakers ...
    (alt.horology)
  • Re: Non-chronometer watch with almost quartz precision on wrist? - Why not?
    ... > non-chronometer watch. ... > tinkering around with the regulator and checking the results on his ... > compared to much cheaper quartz movements) loss/gain values of "a real ... > watch" take delight in learning that good mechanical watches can indeed ...
    (alt.horology)
  • Re: Sellita vs. ETA again 9was Re: Future of ETA movements?)
    ... This watch does not have a fine regulator like a 2824 at all. ... that is the stud carrier and you should not touch it at all. ... brass regulator pins that the hairspring passes thru. ...
    (alt.horology)
  • Re: Help needed.
    ... Potentially it is pointing to a hairspring problem, or your watch is ... careful, since you need to poke and push at a place where a simple ... Basically, where the balance wheel is, you will see the hairspring. ... the other is the regulator. ...
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  • Re: Question qbout "beat error"
    ... One reason a watch should be in beat is for the hairspring to use it's ... i'm guessing you will have a movable stud so it ... By design, when you push the stud, it moves together with the ... regulator, but the regulator should not carry the stud.. ...
    (alt.horology)