Re: air conditioner circuit breaker trips



On May 11, 11:34 am, jamesgangnc <jamesgan...@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:
On May 11, 9:07 am, "Stormin Mormon"





<cayoung##spambloc...@xxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
One of several choices.

1) you have a mystery electrical problem
2) Your breaker is weak
3) The system is overloaded for some reason, and drawing too
high of current.

Did it trip the single breaker to the air handler, or the
double to the outdoor unit?

--
."A.Taylor" <taylor1n2NOS...@xxxxxxxxxxx> wrote in message

news:D-adnfbNMtaALNzZRVn-qQ@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx
I live in Dallas and the weather has been very nice until
today. Today I
decided to use the central A/C, the unit ran without
incident for maybe 20
minutes than the circuit breaker tripped. I reset the
breaker and 10 minutes
later again the circuit breaker tripped (The a/c was cold
before the breaker
tripped and returned cold after I flipped the breaker). What
is going on
here?

I believe I have a heat pump unit (you know the one that
gets cold but not
as cold as someone with a regular unit). Thanks in advance.

Heat pumps cool just as much as a regular ac.  Works the same way.
Just reverses in winter to provide heat instead of ac.

A relatively cheap thing you can try is to replace the breaker if that
is within your diy abilities.  Turn off the main first of course.
Regular breakers are less than $10 at lowes or home depot.  Breakers
do get weak.  If you can find the paperwork for the unit you might
confirm that the correct sized breaker is on the circuit.  Do not be
tempted to increase the breaker size unless you know that a larger
breaker is called for by the heat pump manufacturer and the circuit
was wired with the correct gauge wire for a larger breaker.

If that's not the problem then something is causing a larger current
draw and needs to be investigated further.  Is it a split system with
the air handler inside the house somewhere and an outside unit?  Or a
package unit that sits outside and has the house duct work hooked
directly to it?- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
==================================================================

Really insufficient info!
What ampere size is the breaker?
How many amps does the unit require?
Is it the original unit or was it replaced by, say, a bigger unit
previously?
Did this start recently?
Has the AC unit been correctly maintained? Filters/air coils kept
clean.

Since it is tripping after the unit running for a while it does
suggest that either;
a) The breaker is getting weak. (Know what you are doing before
working on that and be cognizant of the correct wire size and breaker
rating).
b) The breaker and possibly the wiring are the incorrect size for the
capacity of the unit? Maybe the unit was plugged in another circuit;
or that the AC circuit is shared with something, that perhaps it
should not be?

Does the AC work OK when plugged in when plugged into another 'normal'
outlet circuit; using if necessary an extension of suitable wire
gauge?

Sounds like something an electrically capable person could diagnose
and fix in 20 minutes!

Just as an example of trying to explain some of these things to the
non technical (which the OP seems to indicate!) ............
There was a case where the circuit breaker supplying a fridge kept
tripping! A long discussion ensued on a local l news group, similar to
the above.
The outcome was that it was later discovered that a daughter was
plugging in her hair dryer to a bedroom outlet that had been added to
the 'same' circuit that supplied the fridge. The hair dryer's 1200 to
1400 watts was sufficient whenever the fridge was running (or perhaps
starting up) to trip the breaker. It was also found that an earlier
user had tapped on the extra outlet for a bedside radio! Never
intended for anything 'heavy'. With the very low power requirement
(just a very few watts) the bedside radio addition had worked that way
for years!
.