Re: The not so great Dumbledore



Thom Madura wrote:

Toon wrote:
On Sat, 12 Jan 2008 17:45:17 GMT, "DaveD"
<davedn1@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

"Toon" <toon@xxxxxxxx> wrote in message
news:ibveo3l7ln38q1q6qp32k64bida7973oka@xxxxxxxxxx
On Thu, 10 Jan 2008 14:22:51 -0500, Drusilla
<gammanormidsERASETHIS@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:

Thom Madura escribió:
remysun2000@xxxxxxxxx wrote:
On Jan 6, 5:55 am, "Deevo" <mcken...@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

Yes they did but not that many years ago. While I didn't go through a
Catholic education, the Catholic schools had a reputation for being
almost
brutal in my schooldays (I graduated High School in 1982). And the
cane was
still used in my times too.
I had twelve years that ended in 1993, and the story of nuns and
rulers were a very popular story, but pretty much urban legend. Pre-
Vatican II, as they liked to call it.
I actually had a nun break my arm with a metal ruler - for - get this -
answering a question correctly! (It was from the next chapter). At least
she was never in a classroom again after that.
Teachers - not only nuns - do this because they think the student is an
arrogant know-it-all that wants to be smarter than the teacher.
CoughHermioneGrangerCough

But isn't that the mark of a good teacher - that they want the kids to end
up smarter than themselves? As opposed to a poor teacher who's threatened by
a smart kid as they fear they'll be shown up?

Yup. But nobody ever said Snape was a good teacher. The fact Neville
feared him so, and Harry and Neville both did great on their Potions
OWLs without Snape sniping at them proves it.


And in Hermione's case, all the teachers except Snape seemed to appreciate
the fact she not only read what they asked, and understood it, but that she
actually did extra or advance reading, unlike 99% of the others, hence they
frequently awarded her housepoints (which probably more than compensated for
the ones we see Snape deducting for her being "an insufferable
know-it-all").

The other students probably objected to her extras. makes them look
bad.

Course, we see the major flaw in house points favorites/hatred.


Interesting that Snape never had a truly good student of his subject
except the one person he tried to hate. All the rest seemed too
intimidated to get anything right. Just what did the students learn in
his class anyway?

he praised draco. And from the newt class that Harry and co took we can see that
HG wasn't the only good student. If Ron and Harry were the only E's in that class
then there were ten O's
Personaly I always woundered if any of the others thought to ask if Snape was
teaching that year.
Still I think most students just wanted to bail from snapes class.


--
Richard The Blind Typer.
Lets hear it for talking computers.
Lets go for talking i-pods!


.



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