Re: Open questions



On Nov 14, 12:22 pm, "R.C. Payne" <rc...@xxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
David Sueme wrote:
On Nov 12, 4:27 am, "R.C. Payne" <rc...@xxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

For a story-internal explanaion, it may be that the relative values of
different features have varied over time. I suspect the inspiration for
Quiddich in many respects comes from Rugby, being the typical boarding
school game that is quite violent and fairly complicated. The two
different flavours (League and Union) allocate different numbers of
points to try, conversion, drop goal and penalty. It might be that at
some point in its history, the scoring system was rationalised, and
although the numbers all came out as multiples of 10, nobody wanted to
break with tradition so much as to take the factor of 10 out.

I played rugby in University. Quidditch is based on "football", not
rugby. There are no "veela" tossing thier hair around at the
sidelines of a rugby pitch.

Which football? American football certainly features "veela" type
characters, while association football does not. I don't think Gaelic
football does either, and I have no experience of Aussie rules football
to comment. The role of quidditch within Hogwarts is very clearly
modelled on rugby within the context of the English public school [1].
The violence and the convoluted scoring system (how we arrived at this
discussion) are both much more associated with rugby than other types of
football.

That said, the pagentry associated with the games, in particular the
world cup as described in book 4 seems to hold much more in common with
American football than anything else.

It was meant to be a parody, not of any particular sport, but of the
place organized sports has in our culture. So, the fact is that the
rules resemble one sport, the scoring system another, and the veela
stuff, something else entirely.

[1] noting that the term "public school" means something quite different
in the UK compared with most other countries.

Which Rowling didn't attend. All her "public school" experience is
second hand. Obviiously, she is quite familiar with the genre and
probably knows some people who did go to reall British public schools,
but that's it. You do not have to be a product of such a school to
write about them.

For a story-external version, JKR can't count, as has been demonstrated
many times.

Isn't that what I said?

Not that I've been able to find looking up-thread.

Robin

As long as she insists on doing all her math in prime numbers, she's
doomed.


.



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